XIn light of the developments regarding COVID-19 we have adjusted the timeline for the Evansville Flag Project to accommodate the health and safety of our committee and the general public. The new Flag Day will be August 12, 2021 and the submission deadline has been extended to March 27th, 2021. As we closely monitor the evolving impact, we will continue to evaluate when and if we will host more in person workshops. Please join us on Facebook for further updates and keep sending us your flag ideas. We look forward to celebrating together as a community throughout the next year!

A symbol for our city.

Be a part of the creation of a city flag for Evansville

There’s no place like home.

If you’ve grown up in Evansville, or if you’re a transplant who’s been here a long time, you know there’s a certain way of life about our city. There’s something about living in a city on the water, where around one turn you’re apt to find miles and miles of lush cornfields, and another turn leads to centuries-old historic mansions. The town’s traditions and celebrations also make it hard for anywhere else to ever feel quite like “home.”

Jordan Baer knows this feeling. He’s spent most of his adult life advocating for and helping to improve Evansville.

Still, he felt Evansville was missing a link that unified the entire community while simultaneously paying homage to the city’s rich culture and history. Not to mention, the area has been inhabited by indigenous cultures for millenia. How many people can say they live in a city that was once home to a thriving community of Native Americans?

Later a town that thrived industrially and commercially, Evansville has never lost its ethos for invention, creativity, charm and of course, innovation.

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A city flag is something that represents our town - that isn’t political. It isn’t a slogan, or a brand, but a timeless symbol that captures the essence of Evansville. Globally, other cities and countries have timeless symbols that represent the spirit of their city, community involvement, and unity. Why shouldn’t we be amongst them?

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Capturing the flag

In 2015, Jordan began planning a city flag initiative, emphasizing the importance of having a symbol to unify the region, to bring everyone together and to represent our history, present, and future.

Then, a year and a half later, this video surfaced:
Then, a year and a half later, this video surfaced:

He was onto something! Other cities were doing this too. And Evansville deserved to be thought about on a global level as well.

Call for entries:

The City’s Blank Canvas

Here’s how it works:

Share your ideas visually, verbally - or both!

Download Good Flag Bad Flag from The North American Vexillological Association for tips on what makes a good and bad flag design.

Click to Download

Upload design files, jpegs, pdfs,- even sketching something on a napkin will suffice!

Better with words than pictures? Describe your vision. Get as detailed as possible. We’ll help bring those ideas to life for the judging committee. Apart from retrieving online submissions, we’ll also host workshops across the city to engage the community and encourage involvement.

We want everyone to have a say, and we want to make sure everyone has access to express their ideas.

Click to see workshops

A picture is worth a thousand words … and thoughts and emotions and memories and places.

Don’t overthink this, but don’t hold back!

Draw or write your interpretation of Evansville and what it symbolizes to YOU.

Download Good Flag Bad Flag from The North American Vexillological Association for tips on what makes a good and bad flag design.

Click to Download

Get the Worksheet

Red might represent pain and anger, but it also represents love and health. It might remind you of the sun setting on the Ohio River, the trees dotting the roads and highways during the fall or the brick streets in downtown and historic Evansville.

Think about the other colors: Red, Orange, Yellow, Blue, Green, and Purple. Don’t forget about Black, White, Grey, and Brown. They’re colors too!

Click to enter
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You snooze you lose!

Get your ideas submitted by

March 27, 2021

Again, it doesn’t have to be perfect. A selection committee and team of professional designers trained in vexillology will interpret your ideas!

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Selection Process

A committee was chosen to represent a diverse cross-section of our community.

All entries, both written and visual, will be printed and presented to a selection committee. This committee will carefully review each submission and determine the most important themes based on your entries.

Meet the Committee

Carlos Caballero
Carlos Caballero

Medical Services of America
Hospice Worker
Marshallese Advocate

Dalton Boszé
Dalton Boszé

Department of Metropolitan Development - Community Development Specialist

DeAndre Wilson
DeAndre Wilson

Turn Table LLC
Keep Rolling Campaign

Erin Phillips
Erin Phillips

Professional intern, USI class of 2018, LGBTQ Activist, They/Them Pronouns

Hope Wells
Hope Wells

Administrative Assistant at Alpha Laser & Imaging

Jack Maxwell
Jack Maxwell

Manager of Community Job Link with the Arc of Evansville

Jason  McCord
Jason McCord

West Side Nut Club, Director of One Life Church West

JoElle Knight
JoElle Knight

Chairwoman of the Vanderburgh County Bicentennial Celebration

Jordan Baer
Jordan Baer

Founder Evansville Flag Project

Kaman Hillenburg
Kaman Hillenburg

Collections Manager at the Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science

Larry Samples
Larry Samples

United Neighborhoods of Evansville

Leonard Collins
Leonard Collins

United Neighborhoods of Evansville

Merrick Korach
Merrick Korach

Community Advocate

Michael Harbison
Michael Harbison

United Neighborhoods of Evansville

Roli Lall
Roli Lall

Project Manager at Astra Zeneca

Stefanie Fleming
Stefanie Fleming

Owner of Stef L's Amour

Summer El-Khodary
Summer El-Khodary

The University of Evansville, Class of 2020, Founder of Cultural Communications, Inc.

Todd Mahooty
Todd Mahooty

ONB Retirement Plan Services, Brescia University Board, Native American Advocate

The design process

There is an actual art and science to flag design, according to the standards of Vexillology. Vexillology is the scientific study of the history, symbolism and usage of flags. There are rules regarding the designing of flags that a successful one must abide, and having a city seal on a cloth violates nearly every principle of Vexillology. City seals were meant to be read at close range, on paper documents. For this reason, they contain a high level of detail and pictorial imagery. This is the opposite of what is necessary for a flag. What Evansville has, instead of a real flag, is our city seal, printed on a large cloth that is a stand-in for a flag. Evansville has never designed a flag for itself. Many cities across the country have real city flags, see Portland (1969), Chicago (1917), Indianapolis (1963) for examples of great city flags, and increasingly, many more cities are either re-deigning their poorly made flags or creating them where none previously existed. A flag should be neither historical or modern, it should be a timeless visual representative of the city for which it is created. It should feel as if it has always been here, and will be woven into the fabric of our community over time. It is something that when done right, will never change, and become a symbol for our city.

The committee will entrust these submissions to a separate committee of 5 professional Evansville designers through the Evansville Design Group. The Evansville Design Group is a not-for-profit organization formed to promote awareness, education, networking, and enrichment within and among the local design community. Each designer will have studied vexillology and flag design and will work together to produce a series of flags to the specifications of vexillology based on your submissions.


Vexillology

Vexi - WHAT?! Vexillology.

Pronounced: vex-ah-lahl-lo-gee

It’s the study of the history, symbolism, and usage of flags. And, yes, it’s a real thing.

Back at ya, Evansville


The designers will share their final designs with the selection committee who originally chose the emergent concepts from the collection of submissions. They will select the best designs based on the public’s original input, and present them back to the community via this website.

Vote now, or forever hold your peace.

The voting process will follow a ranked choice voting system. You’ll get to rank your favorite designs in order of preference.

This matters. A lot. It’s the city we all live, work and play in. And you, the people, have all the input. So weigh in. Comment. Share. Discuss. Start a dialogue. Vote.

This flag will be around forever. We want it to look good to all of us.